Status of construction activity at the direct reduction plant in Corpus Christi 2 minutes spent reading

Status of construction activity at the direct reduction plant in Corpus Christi

Viktoria Steininger
Redaktionell verantwortlich für die Themen am Blog, recherchiert und schreibt Viktoria Steininger auch selbst und gibt mit Geschichten Einblicke in den voestalpine-Konzern.

Construction of the new direct reduction plant in Corpus Christi, Texas, is scheduled for completion late 2015 / early 2016. Once complete, two million tons of HBI (hot briquetted iron) will be produced here annually.

At EUR 550 million, the direct reduction plant currently being constructed in Corpus Christi is the voestalpine Group’s largest ever foreign investment. In future, the voestalpine Texas LLC plant will produce 2 million tons of HBI (hot briquetted iron) annually. This will generate an extra 150 jobs, 50% of which have already been filled.

Construction status in October 2015

Construction of the HBI plant is progressing quickly. The reduction tower has now almost reached its final height of 137 meters, and the plant’s own port is completely finished. Around 2,000 workers are currently active at the construction site so that building can be completed on schedule in late 2015 / early 2016. The production start is planned for the first half of 2016.

Direct reduction plant in Texas safeguards Austrian sites

60% of the HBI will be sold to external customers whilst 40% will be shipped to the voestalpine sites in Linz and Donawitz. As a result, the new HBI plant plays an important role in ensuring that steel will be produced in Austria over the long term. HBI is a high quality, environmentally-friendly pre-material which offers voestalpine many advantages:

  • Optimization of the blast furnace process with HBI
  • Improvements to the CO2 balance (by using natural gas rather than coke/coal)
  • Reduced need to buy in coke and a long-term reduction in raw material costs, as well as a
  • Reduction in regional dependencies.

These images show the status of the construction activities and the size of the plant.

Viktoria Steininger