Forging ahead: yesterday, today and tomorrow 2 minutes spent reading
Aerospace

Forging ahead: yesterday, today and tomorrow

Volkmar Held

Near-net-shape forging on the world’s largest spindle press and the computer simulation of material behavior and forming steps ensure that BÖHLER Schmiedetechnik GmbH will continue to be a leader among aerospace suppliers in the future as well.

Aerospace Infographic

With its forging expertise, the voestalpine company was already able to profit from the boom in aviation during the 1990s. With continued improvement of its technologies, it has secured an exceptional starting position for supplying major aircraft producers in the coming decades. The current scope of deliver includes

  • Wing components,
  • Engine mounts,
  • Landing gear components,
  • Engine discs, and
  • Structural components for aircraft fuselage.

The company supplies more than 110,000 parts each year to roughly 200 customers worldwide. With this, an export quota of 98 percent is maintained.

Investment in the future

Aerospace customers want future components to offer even less variation in their properties and the shortest development times possible – and they want these things at a lower price as well. The challenges are in the direction of more precise prediction of properties, automation and intelligent networking of the manufacturing process, among others.

voestalpine is responding to this with further investment in coming years in the near-net-shape forging area of technology. Further refinement of the process will be achieved with the automation of the preforming line. “We will become even more energy-efficient and further improve the ratio of finished parts to forgings,” production manager Johann Tockner announced. “Automation of the preforming line will not only replace heavy physical labor, but will also contribute to more consistent component properties.”

voestalpine technologies allow successful forgings to take off – in every aircraft from the world’s biggest manufacturers.